Simple rules for happy childhood

parent

A very interesting philosophy I found in the following article:
How to raise a happy child (ages 2 to 4) by Jill Storey (July 2006)

What she suggests as ideas consists a few simple rules about raising a happy child. Here are some extracts from the article, that I see applying to our case.

  • Learn to read the signs
  • Conversely, says Hallowell, the signs of an unhappy child are clear: The child "is withdrawn, quiet, not eating very much, doesn't spontaneously get involved with other children, doesn't play, doesn't ask questions, doesn't laugh and smile, and has very spare speech."

  • Make room for fun
  • Help them develop their talents
  • Healthy bodies, happy children
  • Let them struggle with problems
  • They learn that no matter what happens, they can find a solution. This doesn't mean children shouldn't ask for help if they need it, but your role is to help them find a solution, not provide it for them. Learning to deal with life's inevitable frustrations and setbacks is critical to your child's future happiness.

  • Check in with your child
  • The best advice on how to know if your child is happy is the simplest: Talk with him. Even more important, says Hallowell: Listen. "I ask my kids if they're happy so often they roll their eyes," he says. "It's a way of checking in, of letting them know that I care."

  • Allow them to be sad or mad
  • Children need to know that it's okay to be unhappy sometimes — it's simply part of life. And if we try to squelch any unhappiness, we may be sending the message that it's wrong to feel sad. We need to let them experience their feelings, including sadness.

  • Be a role model
  • According to Dora Wang, assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine and mother of 3-year-old Zoe, research shows that you can pass on your temperament to your children — not necessarily through your genes, but through your own behavior and childrearing style. For better or worse, children pick up on their parents' moods. Even young babies imitate their parents' emotional style, which actually activates specific neural pathways.

  • Teach them to do meaningful things
  • Even helping out with simple household chores, such as taking the laundry out of the drier, can help your preschooler feel that she's making a contribution.

  • Get help
  • They learn that no matter what happens, they can find a solution. This doesn't mean children shouldn't ask for help if they need it, but your role is to help them find a solution, not provide it for them. Learning to deal with life's inevitable frustrations and setbacks is critical to your child's future happiness.

Cooking: 

Tags: